Embarrassing

Reading the Globe’s fawning coverage of Governor Patrick’s testimony in the Sal DiMasi trial, I get the same queasy, vicariously embarrassed feeling I used to get back in high school, watching the nerdy kid with a crush try in vain to impress a pretty girl.  [Okay, fine.  I get the same queasy vicariously embarrassed feeling other kids used to get watching me try to impress the pretty girl. Whatever.  The point is the feeling.]  You want to tell the poor kid to stop.  She may throw you a smile, but she isn’t going to prom with you no matter how many times you notice her haircut or whisper her an answer in biology class.


Here’s the straight news article, on the front page:


Inside the courtroom, the governor seemed collected as he answered questions from prosecutors and defense lawyers. He put on reading glasses to see evidentiary documents, holding the glasses by the tip of their frames


By the tips of their frames, he held them!  How much more “collected” could a mere mortal be?

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About CriticalDan

  • …the Gov was nervous or anything but a calm witness?  Complain all you want about “new journalism” injecting opinion into the story.  

    Even the Herald couldn’t avoid fawning…Patrick, “touted his administration’s actions…insisting he acted swiftly”  

    Your point seems to be the Globe presented Patrick in a good light…yet you don’t supply a version of the events that contradict the fact that Patrick had a solid, gaffe-free, day yesterday.

    I don’t think your feeling queasy…I’ll bet more of a feeling of frustration, that you have almost four more years of Deval Patrick as Governor.    

  • CVarley

    He’s so calm and collected because the D machine in this state figured out months (maybe years) ago who was going down and who would get off. We all know that.

    Thank you, though, for stating what all of us were thinking as we choked on our morning coffee. You have, once again, shown yourself to be one of MA’s most accurate, honest and entertaining political bloggers.

  • Inside the courtroom, the governor seemed collected as he answered questions from prosecutors and defense lawyers, however he required reading glasses to see evidentiary documents, holding the glasses by the tip of their frames like an old man struggling to read the print on a bottle of pills, a crack in the otherwise relaxed time on the stand.  Only time will tell how much the glasses incident influenced the jury.

    The glasses are key!