Gov. Pinocchio’s REAL Education Record – It Ain’t Pretty!

From the Baker campaign (good job getting the truth out there, guys!):

Governor Patrick’s Real Record on Education

Governor Patrick continued to mislead voters with his negative campaign against Charlie Baker today with another misleading press release, but a closer look shows his real record on education, a record that includes hundreds of millions in cuts, the loss of more than 3,200 teachers, and school fees that have risen across the state.

Fact: School fees have increased in communities across Massachusetts.

Except for a fortunate few, most cash-strapped communities south of Boston supplement school sports budgets with user fees. This year, a lot of those fees are higher, and one town is imposing a fee for the first time. (Source: The Boston Globe, “To Play, you pay; As Districts slash funding, many high school sports programs rely on athletic fees and private fund-raising for their survival,” August 29, 2010)

Fact: There are 3,200 fewer teachers today than when Deval Patrick took office.

According to the Massachusetts Department of Education, there were a total of 73,176 teachers during the 2006-2007 school year. There are currently 69,908 teachers.  

Fact:  Governor Patrick has cut education funding by $440M.  In total, Deval Patrick has cut education and municipal funding by $930M.



Governor Patrick has cut funding to K-12 Education:

·  Chapter 70 K-12 education aid has decreased by $28M since FY2009 (Source: MA Taxpayer’s Foundation, Question 3: Heading over the Cliff Report, September 2010)

·  Other K-12 education aid has decreased by $190M since FY2009 (Source: MA Taxpayer’s Foundation, Question 3: Heading over the Cliff Report, September 2010)

·  Municipal aid to cities and towns has been cut by $487M (Source: MA Taxpayer’s Foundation, Question 3: Heading over the Cliff Report, September 2010)

·  These cuts have led to fewer teachers today.  There are 3,200 fewer teachers today than when Deval Patrick became Governor (Source: MA Department of Education)

·  These cuts have led to higher sports fees.  Except for a fortunate few, most cash-strapped communities south of Boston supplement school sports budgets with user fees. This year, a lot of those fees are higher, and one town is imposing a fee for the first time. (Source: The Boston Globe, “To Play, you pay; As Districts slash funding, many high school sports programs rely on athletic fees and private fund-raising for their survival,” August 29, 2010)

Governor Patrick has cut funding to public higher education

·  Higher Education funding has been cut by $140M since FY2009 (Source: MA Taxpayer’s Foundation, Question 3: Heading over the Cliff Report, September 2010)

Cuts to higher education have led to higher fees and tuition

·  The University of Massachusetts increased student fees by 15.8 percent, costing each student $1,100 more in fees.  This was the largest increase since 2004 (Source: Boston Globe, Fee hikes weigh on students,” June 3, 2010)

·  At state and community colleges, at least 17 out of 24 campuses are seeking fee increases of between 3 percent and 13 percent. (Source: Boston Globe, Fee hikes weigh on students,” June 3, 2010)

·  Salem State College trustees approved a 5.6 percent fee increase last night on top of last year’s 5.9 percent increase because of a 20 percent drop in state support over the last two years, including four rounds of cuts since fall 2008, said Andrew Soll, vice president for finance and administration. (Source: Boston Globe, Fee hikes weigh on students,” June 3, 2010)

·  “The state is not recognizing that we’re supposed to have a school that the working class of Massachusetts can afford, and it just keeps on putting higher education further and further out of reach,” said Sam Dreyfus, a senior at UMass Amherst from Brookline. (Source: Boston Globe, Fee hikes weigh on students,” June 3, 2010)

Other Education

·  Early Education funding has been cut by $85M since FY2009 (Source: MA Taxpayer’s Foundation, Question 3: Heading over the Cliff Report, September 2010)

The percentage of state budget spending on education and local aid is lower today than what it was 10 years ago (Source: MA Taxpayer’s Foundation, State Finances: Heading Over the Cliff presentation, September 14, 2010)

· The percentage of elementary and secondary education spending has decreased by 2%.  In FY2000, elementary and secondary education represented 16% of the state budget.  In FY2010, elementary and secondary education represented 14% of the state budget.

· The percentage of higher education spending has decreased by 2%.  In FY2000, higher education spending represented 5% of the state budget.  In FY2010, higher education represented 3% of the state budget.

· The percentage of local aid spending has decreased by 4 percent.  In FY2000, local aid spending represented 7% of the state budget.  In FY2010, local aid spending represented 3% of the state budget.

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