Election ’08

Question 1.  It failed because, (1) outspent 10:1 ‘no’ would have prevailed even if no meant that the State will kill your kitten and (2) it was too extreme and even though the Legislature would have reversed the referendum outcome and perhaps actually discussed spending, opposition didn’t have to discuss such nuance.

Question 2.  I could give a rat’s ass.  I don’t smoke pot.

Question 3.  Damn shame.  Classic that the Globe now runs sad stories about all the folks losing their jobs.  Question 3 is yet another symptom of the political strength of large metropolitan areas.  In a large population center, a faction coalesces more easily and foists its values on the rest of the less urban state.  Can Kelo be far behind?  How long is it ’til a faction in Boston declares it fair, just and proper to seize private property because the particular use offends their delicate sensibilities, and initiates their concerns in the form of another ballot question.

Obama.  Was there any real doubt given the economy?  The giddyness of Obama reminds me of attitudes when Jimmy Carter was elected: the demise of the Republicans; the rise of populist government.  That ended well. Summary, Obama won a smaller vote percentage than George H.W. Bush.

Reports of the death of the Republican party are premature.

Republican in N.E.  Come on leadership, throw ’em a bone here.  New England economy is in pretty good shape. Even in the current recession, the tax revenues Y-T-D are approximately equal to those of same period ’07.  The economic success is not because of Democrats, it’s because of New England.  But, Democrats haven’t done anything so tragically wrong to wreak havoc and so long as the economy’s in decent shape why will a centrist population vote them out?  Given the state of the State, that leaves (at least) 2 options: (1) wait for the catastrophe.  The scandal, the economic earthquake, the next big thing; blame the Democrats and hope the population opts for the other Party, or (2) opt for a 351 Reform strategy and press leadership for a plan to gain offices in each and every town with an issue that resonates.  Property tax reform for example.  A simple idea. A Contract with America, but on the Statewide level.  Maybe a proposal for a income tax credit up to $500 for local property or local excise tax paid.  It’s very not Republican to go for grass roots politics, but is there another choice?

About gary

  • Karl Marx

    “Question 3 is yet another symptom of the political strength of large metropolitan areas.  In a large population center, a faction coalesces more easily and foists its values on the rest of the less urban state.  Can Kelo be far behind?  How long is it ’til a faction in Boston declares it fair, just and proper to seize private property because the particular use offends their delicate sensibilities, and initiates their concerns in the form of another ballot question.”

    Gary I don’t think you’ve seen anything yet. The Massachusetts Metropolitan Area Planning Council is waiting to expand its power over cities and towns. Think twice about regionalization.

    A few months ago (I can remember) the Boston fed hosted a former Clinton bureaucrat who know obsesses about metropolitan areas (watch out red states) and how all power should go to them (I’m appreviating of course)

  • The Angelic One

    Regionalization will be the next wave of incremental socialism for this state. Goodbye Home Rule & Hello Leviathan!