Smackdown

( – promoted by Cool Cal)

Speaker DiMasi announced that the House Ways and Means version of the state budget for year ending 2008, will NOT rely on revenue from business tax code changes proposed by Governor Patrick.

The Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) publicly applauded the Speaker’s remarks.

Full text:

Associated Industries of Massachusetts applauds Speaker DiMasi for his remarks relative to the state’s business climate. Noting the recent efforts by the Legislature to improve the climate through job training, economic stimulus, health insurance reform, and permit streamlining, the Speaker also announced that the House Ways and Means version of the state budget for next fiscal year will be released on April 11, 2007 and will not rely on revenue from business tax code changes proposed by Governor Patrick.

Instead, the Speaker proposed the creation of a tax code task force to review the state’s entire tax code and to make recommendations for rebalancing the code to make it more simple, fair and predictable.

Associated Industries of Massachusetts urges the Speaker to establish clear goals for this review and would propose the following

The tax code ought to be reformed so as to create a highly stable revenue base upon which to build the state’s budget.
The tax code ought to be structured to encourage investment in Massachusetts that leads to job stability and creation.
Establishing a more stable revenue stream, and reducing reliance on revenue derived from cyclical sources would position the state to avoid the recurring boom and bust cycles which have occurred over the last two decades.

By encouraging investment, Massachusetts ensures that in the competition for jobs, the Commonwealth and its residents have secure employment and economic opportunity in the future.

We are urging our members to contact the Speaker to thank him for his thoughtful approach and to encourage him to adopt the goals as outlined above.

About gary

  • Kinda terrifying to think that among the “leadership” trio of Deval, Sal and Murray, Sal may be the “moderate” of the bunch.  Ugh.

    That said, let’s get this right out there up front…

    … the Speaker proposed the creation of a tax code task force to review the state’s entire tax code and to make recommendations for rebalancing the code to make it more simple, fair and predictable.

    Simple == forget about all those pesky deductions (like they already did away with the charity deduction) on the MA-1 form

    Fair == we’re going to stick it to anyone who fits the Democrat definition of “rich” – meaning that if you make more than $75K per year, we’re talking about you

    Predictable == see above.

    Never forget who is going to be writing/signing-off on this “simple”, “fair” and “predictable” tax code, folks.

  • gary

    DiMasi won’t increase the corporate tax, but will reach into the rainy day fund.  Gripes, they’ll do anything to avoid addressing spending won’t they.

    I must quote the 2006 Globe:

    Democrat Deval Patrick, in his campaign position papers, contends that he has found $735 million in potential savings in the state budget. He wants to limit legislative authorization of specific spending projects, enforce wage and hour laws, improve detection of Medicaid fraud, and increase the transparency of the budget process. It remains to be seen whether these savings are real, and even if they are, many of Patrick’s proposals would take years to implement — which he acknowledges. The next governor faces an immediate revenue-spending imbalance.

    The Globe endorsed Patrick this week because he is savvy enough to understand these numbers and offers a possibility of ending the Republican-Democrat impasse on Beacon Hill, which in the guise of two-party government has often resulted in unilateral actions by the governor and unrestrained spending by the Legislature. A Democratic governor with the skills Patrick possesses and the mandate he deserves should have better success at convincing the Legislature to use taxpayers’ money responsibly.

      full text

    First, and obvious question:  where’s the $725 million Governor?

    Second, remember if you will that Romney vetoed the Legislature’s grab on the Rainy Day Fund in late 2006, then soon after taking office, Patrick reversed Romney’s veto with his BYOG bill (Build your own Gazebo).

    And now, we’ve come full circle.

    It’s once again the Legislature seeking to reach into the Rainy day fund, but this time there’s a Governor who instead, wants to raise taxes.  No one’s there to advocate for less spending.